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Exercise Ups Sexual Function in Women on Antidepressants

Exercise Ups Sexual Function in Women on Antidepressants

Improves sexual desire and global sexual function

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 18, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise improves sexual function in women experiencing sexual side effects due to antidepressants, according to a study published online Nov. 1 in Depression and Anxiety.

Tierney A. Lorenz, Ph.D., and Cindy M. Meston, Ph.D., from the University of Texas at Austin, compared sexual activity in 52 women who reported antidepressant sexual side effects and were randomized to exercise immediately before sexual activity or to exercise separate from sexual activity. After three weeks, each group switched to the other group.

The researchers found that exercise immediately before sexual activity significantly improved sexual desire and significantly improved global sexual function in women with sexual dysfunction at baseline. Women who scheduled regular sexual activity had a significant improvement in orgasm function, with exercise providing no additional benefit. Sexual satisfaction was unaffected by both regular sexual activity or exercise.

"The results of the present study suggest that exercise improves sexual function in women experiencing sexual arousal side effects of antidepressants, with modest evidence of a specific benefit in exercising immediately before sexual activity," Lorenz and Meston conclude.

Abstract (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/da.22208/abstract )Full Text (subscription or payment may be required) (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/da.22208/full )